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How To Determine Resting Heart Rate

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How Can You Use Your Target Heart Rate

How to Figure Your Resting Heart Rate

You can use your target heart rate to know how hard to exercise to gain the most aerobic benefit from your workout. You can exercise within your target heart rate to either maintain or raise your aerobic fitness level. To raise your fitness level, you can work harder while exercising to raise your heart rate toward the upper end of your target heart rate range. If you have not been exercising regularly, you may want to start at the low end of your target heart rate range and gradually exercise harder.

To take your heart rate during exercise, you can count the beats in a set period of time and then multiply by a number to get the number of beats per minute. For example, if you count your heartbeat for 30 seconds, double that number to get the number of beats per minute. You can also wear a heart rate monitor during exercise so you do not have to take your pulse. A heart rate monitor shows your pulse rate continuously, so you see how exercise changes your heart rate. Then you can work harder or easier to keep your heart working in your target heart rate range.

Target heart rate is only a guide. Each individual is different, so pay attention to how you feel, how hard you are breathing, how fast your heart is beating, and how much you feel the exertion in your muscles.

How To Find Your Target Heart Rate

First, it helps to know your resting heart rate, Martin says. Find your pulse . Then count the number of beats in a minutethats your resting heart rate. The average resting heart rate is between 60 and 100, he says. The more fit you are, the lower your resting heart rate for very fit people, its in the range of 40 to 50 beats per minute.

Target heart rate is generally expressed as a percentage of your maximum safe heart rate. The maximum rate is based on your age, as subtracted from 220. So for a 50-year-old, maximum heart rate is 220 minus 50, or 170 beats per minute. At a 50 percent exertion level, your target would be 50 percent of that maximum, or 85 beats per minute. At an 85 percent level of exertion, your target would be 145 beats per minute. Therefore, the target heart rate that a 50-year-old would want to aim for during exercise is 85 to 145 beats per minute.

But theres an easier way to figure it out if you want to skip the math: Wear a fitness tracking device, or exercise on a treadmill or other machine that calculates target heart rate for you, Blaha suggests.

How Does A Health App Measure Heart Rate

The Health app can measure your heart rate and all you need to do is place your fingertip on your phones camera lens and the app will detect the colour change on your fingertip each time your heart beats . Then, it uses the information collected to calculate your heart rate but if you are using the Apple Watch it may measure your heart rate automatically.

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Where Is It And What Is A Normal Heart Rate

The best places to find your pulse are the:

  • wrists
  • side of your neck
  • top of the foot

To get the most accurate reading, put your finger over your pulse and count the number of beats in 60 seconds.

Your resting heart rate is the heart pumping the lowest amount of blood you need because youre not exercising. If youre sitting or lying and youre calm, relaxed and arent ill, your heart rate is normally between 60 and 100 .

But a heart rate lower than 60 doesnt necessarily signal a medical problem. It could be the result of taking a drug such as a beta blocker. A lower heart rate is also common for people who get a lot of physical activity or are very athletic. Active people often have a lower resting heart rate because their heart muscle is in better condition and doesnt need to work as hard to maintain a steady beat. A low or moderate amount of physical activity doesnt usually change the resting pulse much.

How Does Apple Health Calculate Resting Heart Rate

How to Calculate Your Target Heart Rate: 9 Steps (with ...

In this guide, we will discuss How does Apple health calculate resting heart rate, how Apple Watch measures your heart rate and some tips in getting a better or more accurate reading. Additionally, we make a few recommendations on the data you might get and how it could be influenced by many factors.

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What The Experts Do

Monitor Heart Rate for Motivation

For Johns Hopkins cardiologist Michael Blaha, M.D., M.P.H., most workoutstake place on an elliptical trainer in his home. His machine has electrodeson which he can place his hands to automatically see his heart rate. Itgives me a sense of how hard Im working, he says.

Blaha also uses his targeted heart rate to guide the course that heprogrammed into the machine, so that he works up to where he wants to be interms of exertion. Knowing your target heart rate and trying to achieve itcan be very motivating, he says.

Stay on Top of Your Heart Health

If you have a new or existing heart problem, it’s vital to see a doctor. Our heart health checklist can help you determine when to seek care.

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We have all used the expression to describe someone as having a “big heart.” Not to be Debbie Downer here but, the truth is that an enlarged heart is a heart that has been working too hard. A smaller heart is an efficient, healthy heart.

Writer/attorney, Bonnie Gabaldon, is the owner/developer of the health & fitness website, BodiesOfEvidence.com.

Bonnie graduated summa cum laude from Oregon State University with honors. She is a member of Beta Beta Beta Biological Honor Society and Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society.

She researched and authored a significant undergraduate independent study paper, The Effect of Female Hormones on Elite Female Athletes During the First Trimester of Pregnancy.

Bonnie attended the University of New Mexico School of Law and Georgetown Law Center, and has been a licensed attorney since 2003.

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The content of this website is for informational purposes only and not intended to be taken as a replacement for professional medical advice, care, diagnosis or treatment by a doctor, dietitian, physical therapist, nutritionist or fitness instructor.

DO NOT BEGIN ANY EXERCISE PROGRAM WITHOUT CHECKING WITH YOUR DOCTOR FOR UNDERLYING CONDITIONS THAT MAY PREVENT YOU FROM DOING SO.

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What Do My Heart Rate Numbers Mean

Your resting heart rate is the number of times your heart beats each minute when youre not active. The normal range is between 50 and 100 beats per minute. If your resting heart rate is above 100, its called tachycardia below 60, and its called bradycardia. Increasingly, experts pin an ideal resting heart rate at between 50 to 70 beats per minute.

If you want to find out your resting heart rate, pick a time when youre not active, find your pulse, count how many times it beats in 30 seconds, and then double that number. You may want to check it several times throughout the day, or over a week, to average out the number and to look for any irregularities.

Resting heart rates can change from person to person and throughout the day, influenced by everything from your mood to your environment. It rises when youre excited or anxious, and sometimes in response to smoking cigarettes or drinking coffee. More athletic people tend to have lower heart rates.

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PT TIPS: How to determine Resting Heart Rate

Its important that the partner wears the watch, so that you can focus on digging deep and not being distracted looking at the watch. This will help you calculate maximum heart rate with more accuracy.

The protocol is similar to the VO2 max test: start the test at around 100-120 beats per minute and increase heart rate by ~5 beats every 15 seconds until you can no longer increase it.

Your partners role is to look at the watch and shout total time and heart rate every 15 seconds. After you can no longer increase your heart rate for more than two 15-second intervals its time to stop. By that time you shoud have reached your maximum heart rate.

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Which Factors Can Influence Heart Rate

Many things can affect your heart rate, including:

  • physical activity if youve been moving around a lot, your heart rate will increase
  • fitness level your resting heart rate may be lower if youre very fit
  • air temperature on hot days, your heart needs to pump more quickly
  • emotions such as feeling stressed or overly excited
  • medicines some can decrease your resting heart rate , while others can increase it
  • age with age, the rate and regularity of your pulse can change and can be a sign of a heart problem.

What Your Resting Heart Rate Means

Your resting heart rate will become lower as your fitness level increases. Vigorous aerobic exercise, such as running or cycling, has the most effect on lowering your resting heart rate. Moderate-intensity exercise such as brisk walking has less effect.

RHR is lowered as the heart muscle becomes stronger and gets better at pumping out more blood per heartbeat. The body needs fewer heartbeats to pump the same amount of blood. If your heart muscle is weak, it needs to beat more times to pump the same amount of blood.

If you are tracking your resting heart rate and see it rise, there could be several causes that aren’t related to your fitness level, including:

  • Being sleep-deprived
  • Dehydration or in cases of high heat and humidity
  • Developing an illness or a medical condition
  • Mental, emotional, or physical stress

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Calculate Maximum Heart Rate During A Laboratory Test

A much more formal way to calculate maximum heart rate would be to take a supervised laboratory test. Also known as VO2 max test, such analysis is a test of athletes physiological capabilities and, therefore, pushes athletes to the absolute maximum.

The protocol is quite simple athlete runs on a treadmill with an ever-increasing speed/power until complete exhaustion. Throughout the test a lot of data is gathered about athletes current fitness .

Ultimately, the test determines not only the Max HR, but also aerobic, anaerobic and lactate thresholds. All this data helps to analyse how training is impacting the body and if something should be changed/adjusted.

VO2 max tests are always supervised by exercise physiologist or cardiologist and/or other personnel, which makes it a much safer environment than a field test.

How Can I See My Heart Rate Data Using Google Fit

How to Calculate Your Target Heart Rate

If you have been taking some measurements with the help of the Heart Rate app, they will be sent and synced to Google Fit. First, open the Google Fit app and on the main screen look at the Heart Rate section to view the stats. You can tap on this section to see more information or details while you can also sort them by time.

Finally, you now have a good way to monitor your heart rate, however, consider that the Heart Rate monitor app or Google Fit will never replace your regular checkups to a doctor nor is meant to make any diagnosis or suggest any treatment options. Try to avoid googling your results, if you have noticed something that doesnt seem right, we recommend paying a visit to your doctor for professional advice.

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What Is Your Target Zone

Target Heart Rate Zones by Age *

  • Age: 20
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : ** 120 170
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 200
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 117 166
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 195
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 114 162
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 190
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : ** 111 157
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 185
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 108 153
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 180
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 105 149
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 175
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 102 145
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 170
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 99 140
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 165
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 96 136
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 160
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 93 132
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 155
  • Target Heart Rate Zone : 90 123
  • Predicted Maximum HR: 150
  • Your Actual Values

    • Target HR

    * This chart is based on the formula: 220 – your age = predicted maximum heart rate.

    Does Your Weight Affect Your Resting Heart Rate

    Yes, weighing too much or too little can affect your resting heart rate. Body size may not impact on pulse overall but if a person is obese, they might have a higher resting pulse than the average, but usually no more than 100. To improve your resting heart rate it is recommended to do physical activity or exercise to increase endurance.

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    Important To Get The Maximum Heart Rate Right

    Maximum heart rate is an important tool to uncover cardiovascular disease. During stress testing, age-expected maximum heart rate is used as a guideline for when the test should be concluded. If the test is finished before the load is high enough, you risk not to detect subclinical heart disease. Therefore, it is of great clinical relevance to have a way to accurately estimate HRmax.

    The traditional formula for determining HRmax is 220 minus age, but can underestimate HRmax by up to 40 beats per minute in seniors. In fact, the method is inaccurate already at an age of 3040 years, and gets more inaccurate the older you are.

    In The HUNT Fitness Study, we measured accurate maximum heart rate in 3,320 healthy adults aged between 19 and 89. Based on these tests we made a completely new formula which estimates maximum heart rate far more accurately than 220 minus age. The HRmax Calculator is based on this formula: 211 0.64*age.

    Track Your Heart Rate

    How to check your resting heart rate (aka your pulse)

    Keeping track of your heart rate can give you insight into your fitness level, heart health and emotional health, Dr. Sinha says. Many people are walking around with a resting heart rate that is too high, due to factors such as too much caffeine, dehydration, inactivity and persistent stress. Those extra heart beats over time can be taking years off your life.

    Dr. Sinha recommends tracking your heart rate as well as keeping a journal of which activities are causing higher heart rates. Then use that information to make changes, set priorities and move toward a healthier life. If daily stress is raising your resting heart rate, for example, think twice about taking on that extra project at work or school. Consider adding a morning walk or a 10-minute breathing session at lunch.

    A final reminder from Dr. Sinha: Get your doctors OK before exercising hard if you have a heart condition or other disorder where exercising may be unsafe. Also keep in mind that certain medications can affect your heart rate, making it a less reliable measurement.

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    What Is A Normal Heart Rate

    A normal heart rate for adults is typically 60 to 100 beats per minute. A heart rate that is slower than 60 beats per minute is considered bradycardia and a rate that is faster than 100 beats per minutes is termed tachycardia . There are some experts who believe that an ideal resting heart rate is closer to 50 to 70 beats per minute. Regardless of what is considered normal, it’s important to recognize that a healthy heart rate will vary depending on the situation.

    Among healthy people, a slower heart rate can be due to being physically fit, a medication, or sleep patterns. However, a slower heart rate can indicate a sign of disease including heart disease, certain infections, high levels of potassium in the blood, or an underactive thyroid.

    On the reverse side, a fast rate in healthy people can be because they are exercising, nervous or excited, using a stimulant or are pregnant. The health conditions that are associated with a fast heart rate include most infections or just about any cause of fever, heart problems, certain medications, low levels of potassium in the blood, an overactive thyroid gland or too much thyroid medication, anemia, or asthma or other breathing trouble.

    How Do You Find Your Pulse

    The easiest place to find your pulse is in your wrist.

    • Turn your hand so that your palm is facing upwards.
    • Now place the three middle fingers from your other hand over your wrist below the base of your thumb.
    • Press lightly to feel the pulse under your fingers. If you cant feel anything press slightly harder.

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    What Is A Normal Or Resting Heart Rate

    There are three general ways to classify heart rate, 1) normal, 2) fast and 3) slow.

    • A resting heart rate is normal between 60-100 beats per minute.
    • A resting heart rate is fast at greater than 100 beats per minute.
    • A resting heart rate is slow at less than 60 beats per minute.

    A resting heart rate predicts longevity and cardiovascular disease, and current evidence suggests that it is also an important marker of outcome in cardiovascular disease, including heart failure. A normal heart rate is generally stated to be between 60-100 beats per minute at rest . However, recent studies have suggested that an ideal resting heart rate is between 50-70 beats per minute. It is well-known that the average resting heart rate for well-trained athletes is between 40-60 beats per minute! A heart rate can change dramatically while sleeping or with daily activity and exercise. Usually, a heart rate will be slower during sleep, faster during daily activities or with exercise, and recover quickly back to a resting rate after exercise. This means your heart has appropriate heart rate variability and recovery, which is associated with good heart health. Your resting heart rate can also be used to estimate how much energy your body uses, or your basal metabolic rate.

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